Copyright Eryn Shaffer

Large Format Photography with Greg Miller at ICP

For many photographers, especially those of us familiar with the medium’s history, large format is the quintessential photography experience. Lugging a bulky camera around, finding the right place to stand- or better yet, asking a stranger to be your model- and then slipping under the focusing cloth, is as much as act of determination as art. Greg Miller is a master of large format and his students at the International Center of Photography (ICP) are fortunate to have him guide their way as they embarked on their first experiences as large format photographers. Thanks for sharing your images!

copyright Sarah Blesener
copyright Sarah Blesener
copyright Sarah Blesener
copyright Sarah Blesener
copyright Sarah Blesener
copyright Sarah Blesener

Sarah Blesener: We all entered the workshop with absolutely no experience in large format photography, and limited knowledge on anything related to the large format world. In five days, Greg taught us the mechanics of shooting large format, as well as limiting our assignments to portraits and street photography. Street photography with large format is an incredible challenge, and this past week was full of lots of failures as well as a pretty proud group of ICP students, scrambling to pull together a small exhibition of our adventures in large format.
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copyright Francesco Chiot
copyright Francesco Chiot

copyright Francesco Chiot
copyright Francesco Chiot

Francesco Chiot: Greg Miller, our teacher, told us about the opportunity of being published on your photozine with the portraits we took at our workshop. As Greg told us I am sending you the photo we used for our final exhibition, plus two contact sheet of the portraits I took in the same session of this one in Alphabet City on Thursday, since there were more Greg liked than what we could print.

This portrait shows Johnny Rozsa posing in Thompkins Square (NY) on the 7th of January, 2016
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Since I moved into my neighborhood in West Harlem, New York City, I have been admiring the constant diversity and openness around me. When I interrupted this woman's walk for a portrait, our relationship seemed to have all of its phases in just a few moments: skepticism and unfamiliarity, learning and discovery, vulnerability and collaboration, and finally... gratefulness. Copyright Eryn Shaffer.
Since I moved into my neighborhood in West Harlem, New York City, I have been admiring the constant diversity and openness around me. When I interrupted this woman’s walk for a portrait, our relationship seemed to have all of its phases in just a few moments: skepticism and unfamiliarity, learning and discovery, vulnerability and collaboration, and finally… gratefulness. Copyright Eryn Shaffer.

A common theme in a lot of my photography is growing up and its intersection with independence and dependence. I study the beauty of relationships in my own life and in others'. Copyright Eryn Shaffer
A common theme in a lot of my photography is growing up and its intersection with independence and dependence. I study the beauty of relationships in my own life and in others’. Copyright Eryn Shaffer

Eryn Shaffer: Thank you so much for publishing our class’s large format work! I can whole-heartedly say none of it could have possibly been created if it weren’t for Greg’s inspiring teaching. Thank you for taking the time to view our photographs- and now publish them!
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copyright An Debie
copyright An Debie

An Debie: The picture was taken in Grand Central Station in New York City. Everyday thousands of commuters and travelers pass through this majestic station in total anonymity and immersed in their own private worlds.

In the way I set up the camera and flash, my desire was to capture a moment as if they were actors on a set and part of a bigger play. The subjects were unaware of entering the scene I created. Ultimately, I gave them a moment of enacting themselves in the daily play of human life.
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copyright Mariajose Fernadez-Plenge
copyright Mariajose Fernandez-Plenge


Mariajose Fernandez-Plenge:
Here is my photograph for the Large Format Workshop with Greg. It is great to hear that you liked our work!
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copyright Paul Barcena
copyright Paul Barcena

Paul Barcena: Very few things compare to the experience of making a photograph with a large format camera, the world slows down and the small details details suddenly become important ones. Just the process from preparing your equipment, to making the photo, to developing the film and making a print feels more artisanal.
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copyright Tomas Mantilla
copyright Tomas Mantilla

Tomas Mantilla: Nicole at grand central. The exercise we were working on in class was to find someone at grand central stop him, gain their interest and trust and then direct them for a portrait. I didn’t feel good telling someone I didn’t know anything about how to look or appear in front of the camera. I told Nicole to stand in front and just look at the lens, either a light leak in the holder or an unwanted double exposure did the rest and created a misty look around her, something that for me says much more than a “correct” staged picture.

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